Response to consultation on ‘National Litter and Flytipping Strategy’

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Members of The Highland Council’s Communities and Place Committee have endorsed a response to the Scottish Government’s consultation on the National Litter and Flytipping Strategy.

The response recognises the benefits that could be achieved by carrying out research to understand the influences on littering behaviour and supports a collaborative national anti-littering behaviour change campaign.

The response prioritises behaviour change interventions for fast food and drinks litter, night-time economy litter, school litter, roadside littering, and tourism litter.

The council’s response is also supportive of the Scottish Government working with local authorities to develop targeted interventions on litter and further work to support community led voluntary litter picks.

The chairman of the Communities and Place Committee, Caol and Mallaig Ward Councillor Allan Henderson, said: ‘We do care immensely about litter and fly tipping in our beautiful Highland region.

‘The Highland Council does respond well to incidences of littering and fly tipping where notified.

‘The response to the government highlights where the council has responded particularly well in providing a seasonally enhanced service – Ranger Service, waste employees, additional litter bins – that reflects the significant impact of visitor numbers in the Highland area.

‘The service has also employed route optimisation software; improved litter bin management through the provision of Recycling on the Go litter bins; and better opportunity for collaboration through using remote meeting technology.’

The council has also said it is supportive of the work currently being undertaken by Keep Scotland Beautiful and Zero Waste Scotland, where there is existing positive contact in Highland with Community groups supporting volunteer litter picks.

Advice, information and support that the council thinks should be included in a national litter hub are litter prevention material; contacts for supporting community clean-up initiatives such as health and safety information; and information on the government’s proposed ‘Citizen science guide’.

The Highland Council has also said it supports exploring raising fixed penalty amounts to ensure they are an appropriate deterrent, and would support exploring alternative penalties, particularly examples that have been successful in other countries, but would have concern over the practicalities, appropriateness and administration of options such as enforced litter picks or education courses for offenders.