Kilmallie minister Rory scales Ben Nevis for army charity

Kilmallie minister Rory MacLeod (second from left) enjoys the weather on the summit of Ben Nevis with the charity team. Photograph supplied. NO-F32-Combat-Stress.jpg
Kilmallie minister Rory MacLeod (second from left) enjoys the weather on the summit of Ben Nevis with the charity team. Photograph supplied. NO-F32-Combat-Stress.jpg

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Three soldiers, one local minister and a five-day trek on Ben Nevis, saw a tremendous effort in the recent scorching weather to raise money for the  Armed Forces’ mental health charity Combat Stress.

Kilmallie minister Rory MacLeod joined some of his former Army colleagues, Staff Sgt Chris Johnstone, WO1 Wayne Marquis and Sgt Mitchell Jackson – all members of 154 (Scottish) Regiment of the Royal Logistic Corps – on the fourth of their five days of fund raising climbs to the top of the Ben and back.

Formed in 1919 as the Ex-Servicemen’s Welfare Society, primarily to help those suffering from ‘shell shock’, it now assists veterans of more recent conflicts with advice, help, and treatment for mental health conditions, such a Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Each ascent was successfully completed and the group had the added advantage of being able to enjoy the spectacular views, with none of the usual mist and rain experienced by many travellers on the path to the summit.

Rev MacLeod commented: ‘I enjoyed joining them on one trip, but I must have held them back, leaving at 6.15am and returning at 1.35pm. I’m sure that must have been one of their slowest times of the week!’