Remember, remember…the impact of fireworks

The Covid pandemic has seen large public events to mark Bonfire Night such as this one pictured, cancelled. NO-T44-scot-govt-col_Fireworks.jpg
The Covid pandemic has seen large public events to mark Bonfire Night such as this one pictured, cancelled. NO-T44-scot-govt-col_Fireworks.jpg

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With Bonfire Night approaching and many events cancelled, if you are planning a private fireworks display at home this year, it’s important that you know how to keep you and your family safe.

If you are planning a private fireworks display this year, it’s important that you know how to keep you and your family safe, so make sure you know the risks, alongside the fun and enjoyment.

  • Check the latest Scottish Government guidance on meeting up with other households outdoors on gov.scot/friendsandfamily
  • Ensure you know what fireworks are suitable for private use, dependent on the size of your garden – to find out visit firescotland.gov.uk
  • Always follow the fireworks code and read fireworks instructions before use.
  • Be aware of the impact of fireworks on others – whilst fireworks are spectacular, they can be very noisy, affecting the wellbeing of those with noise sensitivity.  The loud bangs, lights and strong smells of fireworks can be challenging for autistic people and pets.
  • Misuse of fireworks can lead to serious injuries – more often than not, it’s children rather than adults who are injured by fireworks. During the bonfire season last year, 85 per cent of all firework injuries treated at emergency departments happened at informal private displays. Over half of those requiring treatment were children.

Deputy assistant chief officer Alasdair Perry is the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service’s Head of Prevention and Protection. He said: ‘First and foremost we would urge all of our communities to follow the advice and guidelines around social distancing to help stop the spread of Covid-19.

‘We know this means that people may consider hosting their own events this year but we would urge caution around doing so because every year people are injured by fireworks and admitted to hospital – and children are particularly at risk.

‘We are therefore strongly encouraging anyone who does wish to host a private event to reduce the risk by ensuring to familiarise themselves with our firework code and fire safety guidance. Do not take risks because the consequences can be devastating.’

Enjoy fireworks safely.  Visit Firescotland.gov.uk.

To report the misuse of fireworks anonymously call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.