Uist and Maltese youngsters link up for special art project

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The results of an art collaboration between communities on South Uist and Malta are now on display in the Western Isles.

Entitled Islands with Views it was the brainchild of well-known stick weaving teacher, Mary Carol Souness, who spent time on both islands earlier this year running workshops.

These classes, which were viewed as a ‘conversation’ between the two different islands, saw youngsters involved not just in stick weaving but also in making their own postcards.

A postcard created by the youngsters on South Uist. NO F29 boat 1 south uist
A postcard created by the youngsters on South Uist.
A postcard drawn by children on Malta, also depicting a boat. NO F29 boat 2 malta
A postcard drawn by children on Malta, also depicting a boat.

In Malta, Mary Carol was hosted by the Gabriel Caruana Foundation at its craft mill venue in Birkirkara, while on South Uist she worked with communities, including two primary schools, a care home and community hub at Lochboisdale.

Youngsters trying their hands at stick weaving on Malta. NO F29 weaving in primary school Birkikara
Youngsters trying their hands at stick weaving on Malta.

Mary Carol explained: ‘The original idea was to compare two islands of different sizes but in different parts of the world.

‘As well as the stick weaving element, the youngsters were asked to design a postcard that summed up what they would like people to know about their island, as opposed to the more traditional subjects of postcards found in visitor information centres.

‘The installation has already been on display on Malta and is now on show in the Kildonan Museum on South Uist until July 19, after which it will move to Shetland in September.

‘I’m very happy with the way the project turned out.’