Exhibition to open in Stornoway

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A new exhibition entitled Palimpsest, featuring artwork by 24 artists from across Scotland and beyond, opens on Saturday May 18 at An Lanntair, Stornoway, on the Isle of Lewis.

Originally inspired by the idea of Palimpsest, ‘something reused or altered but still bearing visible traces of its earlier form’, this exhibition includes a selection of artworks created in response to this concept.

The exhibition is the result of an ongoing partnership between the Society of Scottish Artists and An Lanntair.

Exhibition co-curator James Lumsden said: ‘In 2018, we launched an open call to artists to submit proposals for artwork to be included in this exhibition. We were overwhelmed by the response, not only from across Scotland but also internationally.

‘The title and theme of the exhibition is Palimpsest. Throughout the medieval period, because of the commodity value of writing materials, it was common for vellum manuscripts to have the original text scraped off and written over.

‘With forensic and other techniques it became possible to reveal the original writing, which could be more significant than what came after.’

Society of Scottish Artists president and Palimpsest co-curator Sharon Quigley commented: ‘We’re delighted to collaborate with An Lanntair on this exhibition. We’re excited to be bringing a selection of works by established and up-and-coming artists to Stornoway.’

An Lanntair head of visual arts and literature Roddy Murray added: ‘It’s been a rewarding and constructive experience working with the Society of Scottish Artists and we’re thrilled to present their work in Stornoway.

‘The Palimpsest concept is particularly appropriate and makes this an extensive, yet focused and directional exhibition. The cultural history of the islands is written and overwritten on the land.’