Colin MacIntyre tunes up for Celtic Connections

Colin MacIntyre and Bernard Butler touring Colin's new album Wakelines.

Want to read more?

We value our content and access to our full site is only available with a  subscription. Your subscription entitles you to 7-day-a-week access to our website, plus a full digital copy of that week’s paper to read on your pc/mac or mobile device.  In addition, your subscription includes access to digital archive copies from 2006 onwards.

Just want to read one issue? No problem you can subscribe for just one week (or longer if you wish).

Already a subscriber?
Subscribe Now

Mull Historical Society and Bernard Butler (formerly of Suede) are set to play Celtic Connections in the new year.

The gig is in Glasgow CCA on Thursday January 24.

Colin MacIntyre, who comes from the Island of Mull, said: ‘I’m really looking forward to returning to Celtic Connections, it’s always a great way to start a new year and an exciting time to play in Glasgow.

‘This year feels particularly special because Bernard Butler, the producer of my new album Wakelines, will be joining us on stage. Bernard is a founder member of Suede and has produced some great pop in McAlmost & Butler — he is also one of the best guitarists of his generation, so I’ll be practising… There will also be strings with the fantastic Hannah Fisher and Seonaid Aitken.

‘New single ‘Little Bird’ comes out then, which felt like a very personal one to record, it’s about daughters. After playing back on Mull at the Tobermory Book Festival I heard that a bus of Muilleachs are coming down for the show, so there will be connections with home in the crowd too!

‘The night before we’ll be recording for the BBC Quay Sessions in Glasgow, so it’ll be a fun time.

‘I’m always in awe of the scope of the programme achieved by fellow Argyll native Donald Shaw of Celtic Connections and of course Caperceillidh.

‘I remember he and I visited Malawi to see the great work of Mary’s Meals in 2010. While there, Donald was busy putting the final touches to that year’s programme — I felt like his assistant watching him map it all out on this giant piece of paper! So it’s good to be on it again.’