Wild About Argyll Festival heads to Glasgow

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Argyll and Bute’s top creative talents will join forces in Glasgow later this month at the Wild About Argyll Food and Drink Festival.

The event, at The Briggait in Glasgow’s Merchant City on Sunday August 19, will feature displays and workshops from independent crafters and designers alongside some of the region’s food and drink businesses.

Designed to inspire creative businesses to connect and collaborate, the festival will feature unique Scottish handcrafts.

On show will be Ray Beverley Furniture, Juju Books, Gill Govan Glass, Design in Harmony, Needlesmiths, BearMakes, Bute Fabrics, Lucy Walsh Jewellery and printmaker Callum Hall.

Harpist Pippa Reid-Foster will be playing and theatre company Three Wee Crows are also scheduled to perform.

Food and drink at the event will be in good supply, with providers including The Tobermory Fish Company, Loch Fyne Oysters, Mull of Kintyre Cheddar, Bute Spirits, Islay Ales and Kintyre Gin.

The event will run from 11am until 8pm. Tickets are £2.50 for adults, with under-16s free.

A joint venture between Wild About Argyll and Culture, Heritage and Arts Assembly Argyll and Isles (CHArts), the event aims to promote Argyll as a must-visit Scottish destination through the people who work and design here.

CHArts communications support officer Daisy Tickner said: ‘Lots of Argyll is geographically remote, but it has exciting cultural heritage that needs to be connected and shown.

‘Argyll’s makers take inspiration from their surroundings to create unique worlds.

‘CHArts connects local makers and helps initiate collaboration, introducing new ways of working and new skill sets so people can achieve things they couldn’t or wouldn’t before. Events such as this are exciting because you can see all the pieces coming together in one space.’