Crofting federation welcomes move on law reform

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The Scottish Crofting Federation gave a positive response to the plans put forward by Scottish Government on taking crofting law reform forward in this session of parliament.

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Economy and Connectivity, Fergus Ewing, put forward his plans for proceeding with the reform of crofting law, at a specially convened meeting of the Cross Party Group on Crofting, last week.

In attendance were representatives of the Scottish Crofting Federation (SCF) including chair, Russell Smith.

‘We are pleased that the Cabinet Secretary has announced a positive way forward for crofting law and restated his commitment to non-legislative changes also,’ said Mr Smith.

‘He promised that we will have a bill in this parliamentary session which corrects the major anomalies in the current law and so enables it to work appropriately for crofters.

‘This is the essential course of action needed and will pave the way to a consolidation bill in the next session. It is exactly what SCF hoped for.

‘There will also be a fundamental review running in parallel which may enable more far‑reaching changes to crofting law, whilst maintaining crofters’ rights, in the future,’ Mr Smith added.

And he concluded: ‘This is very good news for crofting. The Cabinet Secretary asked for input to the bill and the SCF is delighted to contribute.‎’