Lorn Drama Festival serves up full menu of plays

Want to read more?

At the start of the pandemic in March we took the decision to make online access to our news free of charge by taking down our paywall. At a time where accurate information about Covid-19 was vital to our community, this was the right decision – even though it meant a drop in our income. In order to help safeguard the future of our journalism, the time has now come to reinstate our paywall, However, rest assured that access to all Covid related news will still remain free.

To access all other news will require a subscription, as it did pre-pandemic. The good news is that for the whole of December we will be running a special discounted offer to get 3 months access for the price of one month. Thank you for supporting us during this incredibly challenging time.

We value our content and access to our full site is only available with a  subscription. Your subscription entitles you to 7-day-a-week access to our website, plus a full digital copy of that week’s paper to read on your pc/mac or mobile device.  In addition, your subscription includes access to digital archive copies from 2006 onwards.

Just want to read one issue? No problem you can subscribe for just one week (or longer if you wish).

Already a subscriber?

 

Subscribe Now

The 20th Lorn Drama Festival put on another fine programme of plays for the crowds at Oban’s Corran Halls last week.

The festival put on three nights of live theatre for the audience’s enjoyment, from drama societies from Benderloch, Seil, Taynuilt, Dalmally and Accent from Campbeltown – but sadly not Lochgilphead Drama Club, which had to pull out due to illness on the Friday.

Benderloch and North Connel Srama Club juniors in the Prof's Big Idea.
Benderloch and North Connel Drama Club juniors in the Prof’s Big Idea.

The last-minute replacement acts, which were not judged, included a humorous talk titled A Tale of Two Ships by the Oban War and Peace Museum’s Bill Leech, which ranged from stories of an escaped monkey in Benderloch to shipwrecks carrying 50,000 left-footed sandals.

Linda Robb in Is That You Clint by Geoff Parker.
Linda Robb in Is That You Clint by Geoff Parker.

Linda Robb performed a short comedy by Geoff Parker called ‘Is That You Clint?’ about meeting her heavy-breathing stalker, and Anuschka Miller performed her original story A Little Voice.

Vivienne Price, Kathleen Hannigan and Carol Thomson then read Robert Service’s poem The Haggis of Private McPhee, sent to the WWI soldier for a Burns Supper in his trench, before a German bombs blows it up, but the thought of the haggis drives a legless McPhee back to the line.

Benderloch and North Connel Drama Club in A Separate Peace by Tom Stoppard. Credit Robert Batty.
Benderloch and North Connel Drama Club in A Separate Peace by Tom Stoppard. Credit Robert Batty.

The festival featured seven plays, including Last Tango In Little Grimley by Dalmally and Lochawe Drama Group, and Tom Stoppard’s A Separate Peace by Benderloch and North Connel Drama Club. The festival’s adjudicator Dave Bennett praised the quality of all the performances, as did audience members.

Taynuilt and District Drama Society’s performance of Trio won the biggest cluster of trophies: best moment in comedy, the adjudicator’s award, and the highest marks for dramatic production.

Taynuilt and District Drama Society in Trio by James Saunders. Credit Robert Batty.
Taynuilt and District Drama Society in Trio by James Saunders. Credit Robert Batty.

Vivienne and David Price, the play’s producer and sound manager respectively, said: ‘Trio is set in a concert hall and features three characters, Violin, Viola and Cello, who go through the motions of farce to savage ends.

‘The author, James Saunders, said of his work: ‘If there  is any theme that runs through my work, it is the absurdity of finding logic in anything.’ His play, Trio, is an good example of what he meant.

‘It is an extremely challenging ensemble piece both for the actors and the technical team and what we achieved was due to their total commitment to the play.

‘We had no idea how the audience would react to the piece and we were amazed and delighted with the result.’

Taynuilt and District Drama Society Juniors in Remembrance by Mark Rees. Credit Robert Batty.
Taynuilt and District Drama Society Juniors in Remembrance by Mark Rees. Credit Robert Batty.

In the junior section, Taynuilt and District Drama Society (Juniors) won first prize with Mark Rees’ moving wartime play Remembrance set in a British park in 1915, followed in second place by Benderloch and North Connel Drama Club (Juniors) with their comic production Prof’s Big Idea by Geoff Bamber. Remembrance’s end scene also earned the award for the best moment in theatre.

Seil Drama Group in All By Myself. Credit Robert Batty.
Seil Drama Group in All By Myself. Credit Robert Batty.

Seil Drama Group’s play set on an island called All By Myself picked up the stage management award, and the highest marks for stage set was won by The Magic Roundabout performed by Accent Players, about two road workers who find a lady camping on a roundabout.

Accent Players in The Magic Roundabout by Bob Davidson. Credit Robert Batty.
Accent Players in The Magic Roundabout by Bob Davidson. Credit Robert Batty.

The festival’s chair David Price said: ‘Whilst I am delighted to see a small resurgence of interest in amateur theatre, I think it is true to say that all our local societies are on the look out for new blood. So, if you’re inspired to take part, don’t hesitate to get in touch.’