Baby otter rescued after mother killed on road

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A baby otter has followed in Bonnie Prince Charlie’s footsteps and made the journey over the sea to Skye, writes reporter Ellie Forbes.

The cub was taken on the ‘Glenachulish’ from Glenelg to Kylerhea after been found hiding in a garden after its mother was killed on the road.

Finder Lizzie Sanders from Glenelg, quickly called the International Otter Survival Fund (IOSF) who have a specialist otter hospital on the island.

Mrs Sanders and her husband Nick took the cub over on the ferry.

Grace Yoxon of IOSF said ‘The cub is about 10-12 weeks old and is eating fish. Once he has been through a period of quarantine he will be introduced to Ganga, another cub of the same age which is now outside in a nursery pen.’

The pair will stay at the otter hospital in Broadford until they are about one-year-old as this is when they would naturally leave their mothers. Human contact during this time must be minimal so as not to tame the cub.

If anyone finds a cub or injured otter, the IOSF urges them not to touch it but contact them immediately for advice on 01471 822 487.