Contactless payments make the world of difference

Mandatory picture Credit - Chris Watt Gerard Butler in Liberia as part of a visit to Mary's Meals projects.

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A DALMALLY-BASED charity will be able to provide school lunches to a further 7,500 children thanks to contactless card donations, writes reporter David McPhee.

Mandatory picture Credit - Chris Watt Gerard Butler in Liberia as part of a visit to Mary's Meals projects.
Picture thanks to Chris Watt.
Gerard Butler in Liberia as part of a visit to Mary’s Meals projects.

Mary’s Meals has teamed up with Lunchbox, which is a contactless payment terminal that enables people to make a small donation using their card.

In the first six weeks, the terminal has been ‘tapped’ 1,500 times, with each tap donating 30 pence to the charity.

Alan Brown, executive director of Mary’s Meals UK, said: ‘We are very excited about this innovative use of technology and we are delighted with Lunchbox’s success which is already transforming the lives of thousands of children.

‘Mary’s Meals has a very simple vision – to provide children with a daily meal in school. It’s wonderful that the effective simplicity of our work is being reflected in this new form of charitable giving.’

Mary’s Meals began in 2002 by feeding 200 children in one school in Malawi from the founder Magnus MacFarlane-Barrow’s shed in Dalmally.

The charity, which operates in 12 countries across four continents, now feeds more than one million school children per day.

Magnus MacFarlane-Barrow, right, alongside Scottish actor Gerard Butler, with children who have benefited from Mary’s Meals.